Thursday, October 9, 2014

Full Hunter's Moon Sustainability Potluck and Moonlight Art Mosey at Bernheim

business first...
 Rainy days drove me indoors where I created this "Winged Vessel" from a block of Indiana Limestone.
 This is another view - it measures 30" x 17" x 9" and weighs about 80 lbs.
...and now for fun...
 Last night, Meg and I made the 3 hour round trip to Bernheim Arboretum with a couple of dishes for their potluck gathering.  Meg snapped this cool close-up of Crinoids on a boulder as we joined the group. (...kind of like unstrung beads, play money or tokens...)
 Claude Stephens, facilitator of outreach and regenerative design, gave talks about the various projects and approaches at Bernheim.  Claude covered many great topics - for me, the most interesting point was his discussion about art and its life as a cycle.  After its creation and life as an art object, he describes the thought that goes into its decay and transformation / recycling into another useful form for the environment.  I silently mused that stone sculpture is a little different than the temporary mediums that he was describing; what is cyclic are the human civilizations around a stone sculpture (....one day to include our own.)
 Yesterday was a 'Moon Medley', starting with the "Blood Moon" at 6 a.m.
 ...then, the rise of the Full Hunter's Moon over the rolling hills of Bernheim Forest. I'd never been to Bernheim after dark, and I was happy that I made the trip.
 The food that everybody brought to the pot luck was 'top notch'!  Afterwards, Martha Slaughter, Visual Arts Coordinator, led the group to enjoy some of their art by moonlight.  Meg snapped this photo of the Hunter's Moon as seen through a portion of Earth Measure.  The artist, Matt Weir, had also attended the event and described to the group the particulars about the project. On the way to the next sculpture, we eased around a very fluffy, white skunk with raised tail (right-of-way protocols were observed). We concluded the event by checking out Meg's sculpture "Emerging", which is aging beautifully. 
On the way to Bernheim, I'd snapped this shot of a 'temporary public art project' in front of Payneville Elementary School.  Following Claude's train of thought: after this sculpture has lived out its life as art, it becomes cow food.  (However, I'm not following the train of thought any further than when it goes into the cow...)

4 comments:

artistatexit0 said...

Cool that the piece you started this post with (which looks like a brachiopod to me)was followed by an image of actual fossils. Nice catching up with you thru the blog.

don lawler said...

always great to hear from you, Al! Actually...a Brachiopod shape would make a great stone vessel...making a fossil from a block of fossils.

artistatexit0 said...

That's an interesting and very contemporary art idea Don...uniting image and substance.

don lawler said...

Is that like...making a cow out of butter? or a stuffed cat from the cat hair that we sweep out from under the bed?